google-site-verification=U0Q4nUf7gy008G2e6vjitL4htHLAso-Tlnzg4z6xYtI College for Everyone with Ken Carriere (Team 22 Studios) - Addressing the ELEPHANT in the Room®

Episode 8

Is College for Everyone? with Ken Carriere (Team 22 Studios)

Is College for everyone?

Ken Carriere with Team 22 Studios is a college graduate that wants to talk about how our expectations and opportunities affect the children growing up today and if college is for everyone. Get the conversation started.

More about Ken:

Born in Winnipeg, Canada, and moved to the US in 1993 with his wife, Angie Carriere who is from Kentucky. 
Earned a Bachelor of Science in Physical Education from the University of North Dakota in Grand Forks, ND. Played and coached a multitude of sports. 
Taught middle school PE in Canada for 4 1/2 years before starting up a successful Record Company where he co-produced a gold level record project. 
Ken has produced countless video projects, TV commercials, corporate Social Media content, and much more. 
He managed an artist who was billed as the World Fiddling Champion (which led to meeting his wife, Angie). 
Currently, Ken and his wife Angie own Team 22 Studios in Sevierville here in the beautiful Smoky Mountains. They create photo images and produce many video projects for weddings, music videos, and corporations. They recently recorded Journey's, Jonathan Cain, concert and produced 5 music videos from the concert. 
Ken is currently writing a book based on his rich life experiences and his diverse business and work background. He wants to utilize his multitude of experiences to assist many younger people who are struggling with work and career decisions. 

Team 22 Studios

2177 Red Bank Circle, Sevierville, TN 37876

865-280-2030  

info@team22studios.com


Transcript
Coach April Ballestero:

Welcome everyone.

Coach April Ballestero:

It's another episode of addressing the elephant in the room.

Coach April Ballestero:

We had a small week break.

Coach April Ballestero:

I had some fun stuff happen and we got to come back with an another

Coach April Ballestero:

amazing leader to join us today, Mr.

Coach April Ballestero:

Ken Carriere, did I pronounce that correctly?

Ken Carriere:

Yeah, that's a French Canadian name.

Ken Carriere:

That's as close as you're going to get.

Coach April Ballestero:

I appreciate that.

Coach April Ballestero:

So can, I've got the blessing to meet you to the severe bill chamber,

Coach April Ballestero:

which is in the smoky mountains of Tennessee, you and your wife are

Coach April Ballestero:

amazing individuals you've done right.

Coach April Ballestero:

Uh, uh, bio or my photography, and you've just done an amazing job.

Coach April Ballestero:

And I'm so excited to have you here and you have so much to

Coach April Ballestero:

share so much history and so much.

Coach April Ballestero:

Uh, background that I'm sure you're going to just weave it

Coach April Ballestero:

right into our conversation.

Coach April Ballestero:

And then when we wrap up, I'm going to have everyone learn more about

Coach April Ballestero:

you, how they get in contact with you, et cetera, and those listening.

Coach April Ballestero:

Welcome to the, addressing the elephant in the room.

Coach April Ballestero:

We created this podcast to invite our guests to speak

Coach April Ballestero:

about what elephant they choose.

Coach April Ballestero:

So we start off right away with Ken.

Coach April Ballestero:

What is your element today?

Ken Carriere:

Okay, well, given, like you had mentioned uh, Coach April that

Ken Carriere:

the have a variety, very background, um, and, and I've done a lot of things.

Ken Carriere:

The elephant that I wanted to talk about was is, is college for everyone.

Ken Carriere:

And, and the reason I, I was thinking about that is it's been something

Ken Carriere:

that's that, that I've started a lot is of course, as we have children and

Ken Carriere:

now we have grandchildren or at least a grandchild, hopefully they can say

Ken Carriere:

grandchildren in a little while, but, uh, anyway, you're always trying to help them.

Ken Carriere:

And, and, uh, and I thought, you know, given the experience that I have, my wife

Ken Carriere:

and I are both college graduates and, uh, And the interesting thing is that.

Ken Carriere:

What, what happens when you're 18 and 19 years old, making decisions

Ken Carriere:

in life and then life happens and, uh, and you make decisions.

Ken Carriere:

And sometimes those decisions don't always work out the way you, uh,

Ken Carriere:

just for example, you know, 27% of people that graduate from college

Ken Carriere:

only 27% are actually in their field that they planned to go into.

Ken Carriere:

So that tells you a little bit about.

Ken Carriere:

Planning and being able to, to, uh, To, to shuffle to one way or the other and to

Ken Carriere:

be able to make changes in their lives.

Ken Carriere:

And sometimes that can be traumatic for some people that thought all their

Ken Carriere:

lives, that they were going to do this.

Ken Carriere:

And then all of a sudden that something happens.

Ken Carriere:

So if you have a question, go ahead.

Ken Carriere:

Yeah,

Ken Carriere:

that part about being our guests is you get to be on the

Ken Carriere:

hot seat about this elephant.

Ken Carriere:

And it's so funny when the minute you brought up the elephant.

Ken Carriere:

I normally, I, every once in while paving a story, just to kind of get

Ken Carriere:

the conversation started and, you know, the years of real estate and coaching

Ken Carriere:

and all the different things, I've got to do own businesses, et cetera.

Ken Carriere:

I remember a year that I actually got to teach high school.

Ken Carriere:

I was in, uh, getting my bachelor's degree.

Ken Carriere:

So actually from SAC Sacramento, state and California, And then I got my master's

Ken Carriere:

at William Jessup in Rocklin, California.

Ken Carriere:

And, uh, ironically, uh, you know, my degree was in vocational education

Ken Carriere:

and then my masters is in leadership and I'm a full-time coach now.

Ken Carriere:

And yet that the journey when I taught high school, I was

Ken Carriere:

so, uh, becoming a coach.

Ken Carriere:

And I remember the day I was grading my high school students, uh, final grades.

Ken Carriere:

And I looked at the year that they were born and they were born the year

Ken Carriere:

I graduated high school and it just hit me like a rock as I came to class

Ken Carriere:

the next day as we were wrapping up.

Ken Carriere:

And I said, I remember sitting in your chair thinking where I'd be today.

Ken Carriere:

And speaking of that 27%.

Ken Carriere:

Gosh, wow.

Ken Carriere:

What a difference today?

Ken Carriere:

And so ironically, even some of the students in my class at that

Ken Carriere:

time, I opened their eyes to some of where they were headed.

Ken Carriere:

And some of them said, have we not covered some of the things they

Ken Carriere:

did, they wouldn't be prepared.

Ken Carriere:

And so I'm curious, how does this, uh, just like these students and

Ken Carriere:

you're talking about, you know, these individuals that are listening to,

Ken Carriere:

or, or the grandparents or the parents that are working to guide people,

Ken Carriere:

contemplating his culture for me.

Coach April Ballestero:

So my question would be, how does that elephant show up?

Coach April Ballestero:

How is it difficult to have a conversation?

Coach April Ballestero:

Because you know, when an elephant in a room it's over here and they're not ready

Coach April Ballestero:

to quite address it, or they're not sure how to address it, how does it show up?

Coach April Ballestero:

How do you see the conversation arise?

Coach April Ballestero:

How do we have a conversation about that?

Ken Carriere:

Yeah, that's a, that's a great question because.

Ken Carriere:

You know, as, as, as adults and then you, and you've gone through life

Ken Carriere:

and you've done the different things, as you mentioned, um, people are

Ken Carriere:

sometimes are just gung ho on talking about my kids are going to college.

Ken Carriere:

My kids are go to college.

Ken Carriere:

My kids are going to college and, and, and, and expectations are very important.

Ken Carriere:

I mean, parents expectations.

Ken Carriere:

I'm one, I'm one of four children.

Ken Carriere:

Um, my parents expect me to go to college, but didn't expect my sisters

Ken Carriere:

to go and guess what happened?

Ken Carriere:

Uh, it happened exactly like that.

Ken Carriere:

So expectations are, are important.

Ken Carriere:

Uh, it, in my, my take on that is that education is important and,

Ken Carriere:

and, and doing what, what you, what you're good at is important.

Ken Carriere:

And so when you talk about somebody that's, you know, they're the parents,

Ken Carriere:

or no they're going to college.

Ken Carriere:

It doesn't matter what.

Ken Carriere:

It it's, it it's such a rigid position to take, because it might not be with

Ken Carriere:

the, with the, with the, the child is, is geared for, so take, for example.

Ken Carriere:

I mean, I taught school for, uh, four and a half years up in Canada and I was, you

Ken Carriere:

know, I was teaching physical education and we had the shops teacher and, and.

Ken Carriere:

We would get in the, you know, like typical teachers, you get in a room and

Ken Carriere:

you start talking about different things.

Ken Carriere:

And he ended up talking about the kids.

Ken Carriere:

I had such a problem with such and such a kid and the other, and the

Ken Carriere:

other teacher had the problem and the other teacher had the problem.

Ken Carriere:

And then you go to the shop's teacher.

Ken Carriere:

He goes, that's my best kid.

Ken Carriere:

And you go like, what?

Ken Carriere:

Well, it's, it's simple.

Ken Carriere:

Just figured out that they, they're not crazy about books, but they're

Ken Carriere:

love to work with their hands.

Ken Carriere:

And so that's a great opportunity for somebody to, to get training

Ken Carriere:

in the area that they're good at.

Ken Carriere:

So I come from a very small school and so we don't have the, the

Ken Carriere:

people there to guide you and to give you that, that direction.

Ken Carriere:

And I think today in today's world, you know, there's more of that, which is

Ken Carriere:

really, really important, but regardless.

Ken Carriere:

Regardless of that guidance.

Ken Carriere:

It doesn't mean it's going to be that particular way.

Ken Carriere:

So, so for these kids that are great with their hands, you know, putting

Ken Carriere:

them in a stream that allows them to get all the training, internship and

Ken Carriere:

everything that they need to be good at.

Ken Carriere:

What they do is such a, such an amazing, um, uh, thing to do.

Ken Carriere:

So if you're, if the parents talk to those kids and they insisting go

Ken Carriere:

to college, they're going to fail.

Ken Carriere:

And, and, um, and they may not even expect them to go to college.

Ken Carriere:

And so what are they going to do?

Ken Carriere:

So there's different, different streams for different people.

Ken Carriere:

And, um, and I remember in our school, even as small as it was, I had a friend

Ken Carriere:

of mine, uh, the teacher friend, he became my best friend after that, but

Ken Carriere:

he used to work with a lot of, uh, at risk kids and, you know, it was so cool.

Ken Carriere:

Because he set up a whole program actually, who is a pioneer.

Ken Carriere:

And he set up this whole program with these at-risk kids.

Ken Carriere:

And he actually took him to the city, which is 20 miles away.

Ken Carriere:

So Winnipeg is 20 miles away from where we were at city about a million

Ken Carriere:

people, many took him and he found, uh, uh, a theater of course, theaters

Ken Carriere:

don't operate during the day.

Ken Carriere:

So he made that a classroom in a mall.

Ken Carriere:

Mm.

Ken Carriere:

And so those kids got to, got to go into the different stores and actually involved

Ken Carriere:

with, with working in hands-on training.

Ken Carriere:

And what happened was he made a deal with each one of the stores that

Ken Carriere:

I'll have my kids come in there.

Ken Carriere:

But when your trainer comes in to train your staff, I want my student there and

Ken Carriere:

they got the boss excellent training from the best people in the country.

Ken Carriere:

Hm.

Ken Carriere:

And in imagine, you know, what happened after that, many of them ended up

Ken Carriere:

with great jobs in those businesses.

Ken Carriere:

Right.

Ken Carriere:

So, so, so when you talk about, you know, college is not for everybody,

Ken Carriere:

these kids would, what would they be doing without these types of programs?

Ken Carriere:

And, uh, and my buddy that's, I mean, it's such an amazing job finding stuff and

Ken Carriere:

training these kids, and they became very productive, uh, people in the, in society.

Ken Carriere:

So that's, that's a, that's a kind of example.

Ken Carriere:

So we started off, you know, how do you talk to people about that?

Ken Carriere:

You really have to know your children.

Ken Carriere:

You have to know how to get them, the help that they need

Ken Carriere:

and the experiences they need.

Coach April Ballestero:

And what I also heard you say, and can I love

Coach April Ballestero:

the perfect example of an individual that literally saw a need and went

Coach April Ballestero:

and created an opportunity because there was obviously a conversation

Coach April Ballestero:

somewhere that was an elephant and he.

Coach April Ballestero:

He was going to find the way to bite the elephant, right.

Coach April Ballestero:

To take the first bite out of it.

Coach April Ballestero:

And there are tons and tons of programs that people don't understand

Coach April Ballestero:

as in job training partnerships acts.

Coach April Ballestero:

I remember at 15 years old, I got to participate and work for the public

Coach April Ballestero:

defender's office because somebody created a program and an opportunity

Coach April Ballestero:

and opened up the doors for me to be trained on things that I would

Coach April Ballestero:

have never been trained on how to have that opportunity not been open.

Coach April Ballestero:

So what I'm hearing you say, and the neck, which leads to the next question.

Coach April Ballestero:

Is, uh, as this calmer, even with the shop T teachers, you mentioned, you

Coach April Ballestero:

know, gosh, this is my best kid, because this is where they're shining and.

Coach April Ballestero:

I'm curious, how do we address, how does that elephant come up and having the

Coach April Ballestero:

conversations and the interchange of teachers and communications and parents

Coach April Ballestero:

so that we can't open up that conversation because in a lot of communities, they

Coach April Ballestero:

have created a training opportunities, regional Apia, uh, ROP programs, which

Coach April Ballestero:

are regional occupational training.

Coach April Ballestero:

Uh, you know, uh, adult skills, construction training, I mean, there's

Coach April Ballestero:

just all different types of training.

Coach April Ballestero:

Uh, yet I think there is a really big elephant in that area.

Coach April Ballestero:

Uh, when that question comes up, is college, the only option is how do we

Coach April Ballestero:

have those conversations and create those conversations for all three parties?

Coach April Ballestero:

You know, the.

Coach April Ballestero:

All those different options.

Coach April Ballestero:

And I'm going to give you a opportunity to have some fun with that.

Ken Carriere:

That's a, that's a good point because how do you, how do you

Ken Carriere:

get everybody on the same page, so to speak and, and, and I'm kind of, I

Ken Carriere:

kind of watch a lot of stuff that goes in education and stuff and, and, you

Ken Carriere:

know, we're, we're, we're still behind.

Ken Carriere:

I mean, we got a lot of work to do because even, even when you talk to kids, just

Ken Carriere:

with basic skills, And, and part of when I was teaching physical intuition,

Ken Carriere:

I taught half-time physical education.

Ken Carriere:

They gave me time, whatever else.

Ken Carriere:

So I took a class called consumer awareness.

Ken Carriere:

They probably, I don't think it was made up.

Ken Carriere:

I don't even know if I made it up, but that's what I did.

Ken Carriere:

And it was really interesting because I got a chance to work with kids

Ken Carriere:

about setting up bank accounts and, and, and how to purchase stuff.

Ken Carriere:

And just the basic skills that people need to have.

Ken Carriere:

How did it.

Ken Carriere:

You don't have to care, take care of your checkbook and, and stuff,

Ken Carriere:

but those things are not happening.

Ken Carriere:

And those are things are so important how to invest money,

Ken Carriere:

where do you invest money?

Ken Carriere:

How does, you know, buying stuff on credit and how much does it cost?

Ken Carriere:

I mean, things that are so, so, so important are not taught because we

Ken Carriere:

have to have this curriculum in place and have to have these things happen.

Ken Carriere:

And, and so, you know, It's a kind of a thing in the industry.

Ken Carriere:

You know, we have lawyers and doctors and stuff.

Ken Carriere:

They make the worst investment decisions ever smart as all get out,

Ken Carriere:

but they, they make dumb choices.

Ken Carriere:

Well, what's, what's it all about if you're working and then you make dumb

Ken Carriere:

educational or financial decisions.

Ken Carriere:

So, so there's a lot of things.

Ken Carriere:

So how do you put it all together?

Ken Carriere:

It really has to have people.

Ken Carriere:

Like my buddy, uh, him in a room with a bunch of decision-makers

Ken Carriere:

and everybody that can see what the challenges are and, and how do we

Ken Carriere:

help these kids, the kids that are on the college stream and, and stuff.

Ken Carriere:

They're, you know, they're well taken care of, uh, in the most

Ken Carriere:

part, however, as I've mentioned, It may not be the way they see it.

Ken Carriere:

Okay.

Ken Carriere:

So take me for example, um, um, I'm going to, I'm going to go

Ken Carriere:

back to my high school years just to give people an understanding.

Ken Carriere:

Young people, adults, all people understanding that.

Ken Carriere:

It doesn't matter what your circumstances are necessarily.

Ken Carriere:

It's how you deal with them.

Ken Carriere:

And so, in my certain, in our circumstances, in our small

Ken Carriere:

little school, I was, I was an athlete played almost every sport.

Ken Carriere:

However, we didn't have coaching.

Ken Carriere:

We had to have a, we had to get a teacher to be stand there

Ken Carriere:

at least to, to, to watch us.

Ken Carriere:

But we had to take over the, the.

Ken Carriere:

Coaching.

Ken Carriere:

So, so we did what we, we put all the drills together and did all this

Ken Carriere:

stuff and it's so we could play.

Ken Carriere:

And then the other thing is I've done.

Ken Carriere:

I've done a lot of music stuff.

Ken Carriere:

I played music.

Ken Carriere:

We had a little, a little band and this is, this is very, very interesting

Ken Carriere:

because we had a band and we thought.

Ken Carriere:

You know, we should do a concert.

Ken Carriere:

There's a bunch of good singers.

Ken Carriere:

Yeah.

Ken Carriere:

And the school let's put a concert together.

Ken Carriere:

So our band put the concert together and we brought people from outside

Ken Carriere:

the area to come in and to sing and to participate, to watch.

Ken Carriere:

We had a gym full of people and we did it all ourselves.

Ken Carriere:

That's awesome.

Ken Carriere:

And so some people would say, well, you had a pretty bad.

Ken Carriere:

Uh, leadership and your, your school, your teachers didn't do anything

Ken Carriere:

and stuff, but you know what?

Ken Carriere:

That was an opportunity because we, if we were going to do

Ken Carriere:

anything, we had to do it.

Ken Carriere:

And a lot of times, unfortunately, today, if somebody doesn't take

Ken Carriere:

initiative, that's an adult.

Ken Carriere:

Then the kids go like, well, I'm not doing anything.

Ken Carriere:

And what an opportunity you miss out on now.

Ken Carriere:

Th the fast-forward, you know, I go to college, I get my

Ken Carriere:

degree in physical education.

Ken Carriere:

I still stay in kind of in the music, playing with my friends and stuff.

Ken Carriere:

And all of a sudden I get an opportunity to start a record production

Ken Carriere:

company just based on, on some of the background, what part of that

Ken Carriere:

means creating concerts and stuff.

Ken Carriere:

And I'm going like, well, I've done this before I can do it again.

Ken Carriere:

And so my whole career shifted.

Ken Carriere:

It is something that I did for fun.

Ken Carriere:

And I did because I had to do it if we were going to get anything done.

Ken Carriere:

And I thought, you know, as I, in retrospect, I look back and I go home.

Ken Carriere:

My goodness.

Ken Carriere:

This was amazing.

Ken Carriere:

That, that little experiences that I had in school, because

Ken Carriere:

we had nobody mistaken the lead.

Ken Carriere:

We were able to, I was able to start a career in that area

Ken Carriere:

and had confidence to do it.

Ken Carriere:

Cause that's, that's really what it's about is having that confidence

Ken Carriere:

to go out and try something new.

Ken Carriere:

And then since that time I've done a lot of different things.

Ken Carriere:

Absolutely.

Ken Carriere:

But everything seems to build on it.

Ken Carriere:

And you know, if, if we were going to help our children, our grandchildren.

Ken Carriere:

You wanted to have experiences because you never know what those

Ken Carriere:

experiences will lead to later in life.

Ken Carriere:

And some of them may not be in, in, in college, say April, no.

Ken Carriere:

We always say that people, you know, do what you really like to do and

Ken Carriere:

make that your, your livelihood.

Coach April Ballestero:

Yeah.

Coach April Ballestero:

And it's so interesting because at the end of the day, it's about providing

Coach April Ballestero:

value and providing a valuable experience.

Coach April Ballestero:

Right.

Coach April Ballestero:

And we get to be a Bessel through our businesses through whatever way we serve.

Coach April Ballestero:

And so you, you set it up perfectly for a couple of things.

Coach April Ballestero:

One, I mean, you have such a wealth of history of experiences and you chose.

Coach April Ballestero:

That's a really powerful statement.

Coach April Ballestero:

I could have just sat back and just said, you know, I didn't have any help.

Coach April Ballestero:

I didn't have any support.

Coach April Ballestero:

Instead.

Coach April Ballestero:

I saw the opportunity and I, I acted, I figured it out.

Coach April Ballestero:

I'm going to learn how to get this done.

Coach April Ballestero:

I got it done.

Coach April Ballestero:

What do you know?

Coach April Ballestero:

It's set me up for this.

Coach April Ballestero:

It's prepared me for this.

Coach April Ballestero:

It prepared me for this.

Coach April Ballestero:

So I'm curious.

Coach April Ballestero:

As we wrap up and we always love to end with the concept of, okay,

Coach April Ballestero:

this is a really big elephant and we can have a whole conversation

Coach April Ballestero:

for quite a while about it.

Coach April Ballestero:

And yet we really want to just allow people to really be

Coach April Ballestero:

nudged, to, to move into action.

Coach April Ballestero:

Right.

Coach April Ballestero:

And so I'm curious if you were to say what's the one bite, an

Coach April Ballestero:

adult listening, a young adult listening, a grandparent listening.

Coach April Ballestero:

What would be the opportunity for them to be a voice, be a vessel to

Coach April Ballestero:

start taking a bite of this elephant?

Ken Carriere:

I think that the most important thing is to be involved as a

Ken Carriere:

parent or as a grandparent is be involved with the teacher councils, the parent

Ken Carriere:

teachers associations and stuff, and, and realize that your voice is important.

Ken Carriere:

You can make a difference.

Ken Carriere:

And those of us that have had the experiences should participate in

Ken Carriere:

that process and say, Hey listen.

Ken Carriere:

You know, and, and, and, and when I was at the end of my teaching

Ken Carriere:

career, because I was moving into the music and, uh, I remember at one

Ken Carriere:

point the principal was trying to.

Ken Carriere:

They were having a problem, getting our free time.

Ken Carriere:

Our hour prep time that vision was taking the school division was taking it away.

Ken Carriere:

And, and so it was cutting down on all our abilities to be able to coach, to be

Ken Carriere:

able to do extracurriculars and stuff.

Ken Carriere:

And I, and I, uh, I said, I was thinking back to my, my situation and I said,

Ken Carriere:

I said, well, why don't we start a leadership program instead of us coaching

Ken Carriere:

and us refereeing and us doing this.

Ken Carriere:

I was thinking back to my days in the school and thinking, why don't

Ken Carriere:

we help children to be able to do the things that we are doing?

Ken Carriere:

Why are we doing everything for them?

Ken Carriere:

And the answer was, we don't want to do this because it's going to

Ken Carriere:

prove that we don't prep time.

Ken Carriere:

And I thought, Oh my goodness, what a sad comment that was that we have to.

Ken Carriere:

We have to not let the kids do anything, just to prove a political point.

Ken Carriere:

And I think that's the point I'd like to end on is it's not about politics.

Ken Carriere:

It's about helping our children.

Ken Carriere:

And if we can put them in leadership positions and put them in situations where

Ken Carriere:

they have a chance to learn something different, uh, intern with people, hang

Ken Carriere:

around with people that you like that do what you like that are really good.

Ken Carriere:

That's that's amazing.

Ken Carriere:

So we have to work together, get in a room together, get the people that

Ken Carriere:

are like myself or other people that have had experiences and say, listen,

Ken Carriere:

there's a better way of doing this.

Ken Carriere:

And helping kids in college is not for everyone, but for those that are, you

Ken Carriere:

know, the other ones that are not going to college, there's lots that they can do.

Ken Carriere:

And even the ones in college needs to have the same sort of

Ken Carriere:

experiences because who knows.

Ken Carriere:

Right.

Coach April Ballestero:

Absolutely.

Coach April Ballestero:

And even the ones, like you said, the 27% that went to college and

Coach April Ballestero:

aren't into that industry anyways.

Coach April Ballestero:

Right?

Coach April Ballestero:

A perfect opportunity.

Coach April Ballestero:

And I just want to remind everybody whether you're in business, whether

Coach April Ballestero:

you're in education, whether you're a nonprofit, you all have a voice in

Coach April Ballestero:

the opportunity of our future leaders.

Coach April Ballestero:

And I know for us at one night ahead, we're building leadership academies

Coach April Ballestero:

and programs for businesses, for people to help show them how to walk that

Coach April Ballestero:

walk and how to give them the tools.

Coach April Ballestero:

And I think that's just so powerful on Ken.

Coach April Ballestero:

How do people get in contact with you to learn more about what you do, how you do

Coach April Ballestero:

it and how powerful you are and being part of your community and being that voice.

Ken Carriere:

All right.

Ken Carriere:

Well, thank you so much.

Ken Carriere:

Again, the coach April for having me on, on the program and stuff I never

Ken Carriere:

talked about photography, or videography.

Ken Carriere:

That might be a whole,

Ken Carriere:

Uh, We are Team 22 studios, uh, Team22studios.com and her

Ken Carriere:

phone number is (865) 280-2030.

Ken Carriere:

And we do a lot of different things in the photography area.

Ken Carriere:

And, uh, of course the talent there lives with my wife.

Ken Carriere:

She's she is, she is an amazing story of herself is so

Ken Carriere:

talented, but anyway, that's it.

Coach April Ballestero:

We're biased.

Coach April Ballestero:

Exactly.

Coach April Ballestero:

We'd love that.

Coach April Ballestero:

And thank you for joining us.

Coach April Ballestero:

Thank you everybody for joining us.

Coach April Ballestero:

We'll be back again next week.

Coach April Ballestero:

And we are always looking to give people the stage and the platform to be the

Coach April Ballestero:

voices in our elephants in our room.

Coach April Ballestero:

Thank you everybody.

About the Podcast

Show artwork for Addressing the ELEPHANT in the Room®
Addressing the ELEPHANT in the Room®
We discuss hard things to talk about and shed light on difficult subjects.

About your hosts

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April Ballestero

Author, Facilitator, Founder, Consultant, Speaker, and Strategic Leadership Coach guiding light bulb moments. Thankful to be celebrating 10 years of guiding, coaching, and leading industry leaders such as attorneys, coaches, chiropractors, financial planners, the real estate industry, and many other sales and business professionals across the nation. The celebration goes on to include over 20 years of business, professional and personal development which I am so honored to share as a vessel to our clients, coaches, and community.
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Eric Ballestero

Eric Ballestero has worked with Coach April Ballestero since before ONE LIGHT AHEAD's inception in 2011 while he was still in school and has continually brought new ideas and a lot of technical help to the team. He now produces the Addressing the ELEPHANT in the Room podcast in addition to being the Operations Coordinator to ONE LIGHT AHEAD.